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Sunday, June 19

  1. 11:16 am

Tuesday, December 15

  1. page Research Narrative edited FINISH CULTURAL LITERACY page! (Or w/e it is) Having done inquiry projects in the past, I was ex…
    FINISH CULTURAL LITERACY page! (Or w/e it is)
    Having done inquiry projects in the past, I was excited to begin a new one for Judith Rodby’s Literacy Studies class; from the moment this inquiry project was assigned, however, it already had a different feel to it. I had already researched how classroom design can affect student success, and whether using contemporary literature in the classroom has more affordance than using classic literature. I wasn’t sure what topic I wanted to dive deeper into for this project right away, but I knew I was going to want to produce something that would help future teachers become knowledgeable about many of the topics we had been discussing during the semester. Since I was only a couple weeks away from graduation (and an actual position as a student teacher) I knew my research would no longer be something that was “hypothetical” but something that I could actually use to help me be more successful in my student teaching career. For this reason, I decided to investigate farther into the main terms we had been discussing in class; my initial goal was to give a definition for each term, theorists who agree and disagree with the term, and potential lesson ideas that teachers could use that connected to each term. My original terms list was as follows: Funds of knowledge, cultural capital, interpolation, power codes, redressive texts, critical literacy, culturally responsive pedagogy, multimediating/web 2.0, DEconstruction of incompetence, bricolage, Households+communities+classrooms, inquiry, identity (identity exploration/construction), essential questions, culture war.
    After sharing this with Judith, I was told that I had a very thorough and useful idea, but I was possibly biting off more than I would be able to chew with such a large term list. I was told to narrow my topics down to the three main ones, but I had absolutely no idea how I would do that at first because I thought ALL the terms were important! I decided I would do introductory research first on each topic and see what followed from that point. Amazingly, after typing each word into Google Scholar and reading the first couple of article titles that came up, it seemed that the important terms separated themselves into main category headings, and the less important- or perhaps less discussed among educators- were eliminated. I settled on the three main research categories of: Culturally Responsive Pedagogy, Funds of Knowledge, and Web 2.0, with an introduction discussing Motivation.
    (view changes)
    11:24 am

Friday, December 4

  1. page home edited ... Wikis Web 2.0 Links and Applications Conclusion Conclusion Research Narrative
    ...
    Wikis
    Web 2.0 Links and Applications
    Conclusion
    Conclusion
    Research Narrative
    (view changes)
    9:43 am

Wednesday, December 2

  1. page Resources edited ... {The Magic of Culturally Responsive Pedagogy- Phuntsog.pdf} {Understanding Culturally Respon…
    ...
    {The Magic of Culturally Responsive Pedagogy- Phuntsog.pdf}
    {Understanding Culturally Responsive Teaching- DYS.pdf}
    {Cultural Capital and School Success- DiMaggio.pdf}
    Funds of Knowledge
    {Bridging Cultures in Our Schools- Trumbul.pdf}
    (view changes)
    10:06 am
  2. 12:04 am

Tuesday, December 1

  1. page Cultural Capital edited Cultural Capital- Hypothesis ... (Bour-dieu, 1977). Teachers, Teachers, it is ... cultu…

    Cultural Capital- Hypothesis
    ...
    (Bour-dieu, 1977). Teachers,
    Teachers,
    it is
    ...
    cultural capital”
    If,

    If,
    indeed, participation
    ...
    the following:
    Hypothesis

    Hypothesis
    1: Measures
    ...
    are elements.
    Hypothesis

    Hypothesis
    2: Cultural
    ...
    school grades.
    Status

    Status
    cultures are
    ...
    their children. If
    If
    this is
    ...
    case, then:
    Hypothesis

    Hypothesis
    3a: Cultural
    ...
    school outcomes
    What

    What
    is more,
    ...
    possessor, then:
    Hypothesis

    Hypothesis
    4a: Returns
    ...
    status families.
    It may be more accurate to speak of status culture participation than of status group membership, and to think of status as a cultural process rather than as an attribute of individuals.
    A person who is "at home" in a prestigious status culture can display tastes, styles, or understandings that serve as cultural resources, making communication easier and indicating status group membership (see Goffman, 1951; Collins, 1981).
    In such a fluid world childhood experience and family background may only partially and modestly determine a person's stock of cultural capital. Active participation in prestigious status cultures may be a practical and useful strategy for low status students who aspire towards upward mobility.
    By contrast, both high status students (who, presumably, receive cultural resources in the home) and non-mobile low status students may prefer to participate in adversarial youth subcultures while in high school.
    If this is the case, we would expect the following:
    Hypothesis 3b: Cultural capital's impact on school success is largely net that of family background.
    Hypothesis 4b: Returns to cultural capital are highest for students who are least advantaged.
    Next:
    Teaching Alternative Texts

    Resources:
    Information quoted from:
    {Cultural Capital and School Success- DiMaggio.pdf}
    (Page 190)
    “It may be more accurate to speak of status culture participation than of status group membership, and to think of status as a cultural process rather than as an attribute of individuals. A person who is "at home" in a prestigious status culture can display tastes, styles, or understandings that serve as cultural resources, making communication easier and indicating status group membership (see Goffman, 1951; Collins, 1981). In such a fluid world childhood experience and family background may only partially and modestly determine a person's stock of cultural capital. Active participation in prestigious status cultures may be a practical and useful strategy for low status students who aspire towards upward mobility. By contrast, both high status students (who, presumably, receive cultural resources in the home) and non-mobile low status students may prefer to participate in adversarial youth subcultures while in high school” (190)
    If this is the case, we would expect the following:
    Hypothesis 3b: Cultural capital's impact on school success is largely net that of family background.
    Hypothesis 4b: Returns to cultural capital are highest for students who are least advantaged.
    Next:
    Teaching Alternative Texts
    Resources:

    (view changes)
    10:41 am

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